Saturday, March 01, 2014

Tan Kim Tian and family (Bukit Brown)

Mr. Tan Kim Tian arrived in Singapore from Malacca at the age of 15. He worked as an office boy in Paterson Simons &  Company. He impressed his boss, Mr. William Paterson so much that he helped arranged for Tan Kim Tian to learn English. He was eventually promoted to be the Storekeeper and Campadore that managed the trade of gutta percha, cloves and rattan.

By the age of 30, Tan Kim Tian had the confidence to set out on his own and formed his own company, Tan Kim Tian and Son Steamship Company at No 1 Prince Street, the first local Chinese company that build and purchase steamships.The company also had assurance of cargo from Tan Kim Tian's previous employer. It started with three sailing vessels and two small steamers and the company went on to owned 11 ships with a tonnage of over 80,000 tons. Tan Kim Tian once bought a large shipment of coffee to be shipped to Europe. Instead of sending it all, he split it into 2 and got a better price for his second one. Tan Kim Tian and Sons was one of the most prosperous shipping firms in Singapore.

Tan Kim Tian passed away on December 18, 1882. His son, Tan Beng Wan carried on as Managing Director until he died in 1891 on Christmas Day at the age of 40 at his residence in Botan House, Neil Road.

Decline of Tan Kim Tian and Sons
After the death of Tan Kim Tian and Tan Beng Wan, the company was inherited by Tan Cheng Siong ( Tan Beng Wan's only son who was only 7 years old at that time). By then, the company was partly owned by Straits Steamship and managed by two of his uncles, Tan Hup Seng (23 years old ) and Tan Hup Leong (in his teens). Straits Steamship sold their stake to Oei Tiong Ham's company, Heap Eng Moh Steamship. Following financial difficulties and increasing debt loans owed to Mr Oei Tiong Ham, Tan Kim Tian and Son Steamship Company was acquired over completely by Mr. Oei Tiong Ham.

Advertisement 1901 (source: NewspaperSG)

Family
Wife: Mrs Tan Kim Tian  (Wee Poh Kiok Neo)
Mrs Tan Kim Tian (Wee Poh Kiok Neo) was buried in Bukit Brown when she died on December 15, 1927 at the age of 77.
Mrs Tan Kim Tian (Wee Poh Kiok Neo)
Mrs Tan Kim Tian;s tomb in Bukit Brown

Son: Tan Beng Wan 
Born in Annam, he was adopted by Tan Kim Tian. The story goes that Mr and Mrs Tan Kim Tian lost 2 or 3 of their first babies. So to change their luck, they adopted Tan Beng Wan, after which many boys and girls were successfully given birth ! Another story goes is that Tan Beng Wan was born from a concubine of Tan Kim Tian. Whatever is the truth, Tan Beng Wan was neverthless treated as the eldest. He studied at Raffles School and at the age of 15 joined Tan Kim Tian & Sons and eventually became the managing partner after the death of Tan Kim Tian. In 1888 he was elected Municipal Commissioner for the Central Ward. He was also a director of the Straits Insurance Company. Prior to his death, he was also in the Chinese Advisory Board together with Tan Jiak Kim, Tan Keong Siak and Lim Eng Keng.

Tan Beng Wan died in 1890 at the age 40 and was buried in a private cemetery in Thomson Road.
Mrs Tan Beng Wan ( Lim Imm Neo ) died at the age of 74 on October 10, 1925 at Botan House, No 46, Neil Road. She left behind her son, Tan Cheng Sian and Tan Cheng Yan, 1 daughter, 5 daughter-in laws, one son-in-law (Lim Siew Hock) , 12 grandsons. She was buried in Bukit Brown.

Mrs Tan Beng Wan (Madam Lim Imm Neo)
Mrs Tan Beng Wan
Tan Cheng Siong (grandson of Tan Kim Tian) went on to set up his own Stevedore company. Born at the Botan house in 1883, he passed away there in June 1977 at the age of 94. Built by Tan Kim Tian, it was occupied by 4 generations of Tan until it was sold in 1978 and demolished in 1980s. It was located at corner of Craig Road and Neil Road.
Botan House in 1968 (source: PictureSG)
Son: Tan Hap Seng / Tan Hup Seng
Tan Hap Seng/ Tan Hup Seng
(source: NewspaperSG)
Committee Member of the Straits British Chinese Association, President of the Straits Chinese Recreational Club, Committee Member for Tan Tock Seng Hospital for 12 years until he resigned in 1906, Committee member of the Po Leung Kuk (Society of the Protection of Women and Children). After Tan Beng Wan passed away, the company was managed by Tan Hap Seng  (managing director) together with his brothers Tan Hap Leong and Tan Hap Swee.

(source: NewspaperSG)
The story of the riches to rags of Tan Hap Seng was well documented in an article when he was finally discharged as a bankrupt at the age of 60 in 1927. Taking many risk and unprepared for the commercial world, Tan Hap Seng was first made bankrupt at the age of 38 and remained a bankrupt for 21 years during which he work as a chinchew on a boat.
Source: NewspaperSG
Son: Tan Hup Leong /Tan Hap Leong
Tan Hup Leong 
Tan Hup Leong had the honor of being the first Straits born Chinese to undertake a travel around the world for leisure in 1895. His route brought him to Penang, India, Marseilles, Paris, Germany and England. His return was via the way of America, Japan and China. He carried with him letters of introduction  from several members of the mercantile community (namely Messrs. Paterson Simmons ) and a certificate stating he is a British subject.

Tan Hup Leong died of heart failure at the age of 56 on August 5, 1926. He is buried in Bukit Brown.
Tan Hup Leong
Son: Tan Hap Swee
Tan Hap Swee passed away in November 1908

Daughter: Tan Bong Soo / Mrs Quek Geok Lin
Mrs Quek Geok Lin nee Tan Bong Soo passed away at the age of 45 on October 27, 1926. She is survived by her widow, her brother, Mr. Tan Hap Seng, two sons: Quek Cheng Teo, Quek Cheng Ong,three daughters: Quek Cheng Noy, Quek Nya Chit, Quek Nya Kerchit, 1 son-law, 2 daughter-in laws, 13 grandchildren.

References
Funeral of the late Mr Tan Beng Wan. (1892, January 11). The Singapore Free Press
Untitled. (1895, June 8). The Singapore Free Press
Death. (1925, October 13). The Straits Times, page 8
Untitled. (1926, August 6). The Malayan Tribune, page 7
Wealthy Shipowner's brankruptcy.( 1927, March 5). The Singapore Free Press
Untitled. (1928, February 18). The Malayan Saturday Post, page 32
Lin, Lee Kip. The Singapore House. 1819-1942. Times Editions, 1988.
Song, Ong Siang. One hundred years' history of the Chinese in Singapore. Ed. Edwin Lee. Singapore: Oxford University Press, 1984.

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